Design.

Natural heights on landing.



An introduction to landing handrail heights.

When we look at the handrail height through the turn, in the middle of the 180º turn the handrail height is the same as half way through one of the goings, therefore although the height of the handrail on the pitches is set at 900 from the riser and going intersection point, at mid way across going the handrail height is 900 plus half a rise, therefore if we split the handrail half way through the turn and introduce a landing run then that landing run will be the same as the handrail height over the nosing plus half a rise. This means the landing will automatically be higher than the pitch line taken from the riser/going intersection but equal to the handrail height in the centre of the goings in the pitch. this makes the handrail feel as though it is at a constant height and keeps the landings higher to increase safety at this point. This keeps the natural flow of the handrail across the landings. To deviate from this natural flow will require ramps built into the turns coming off the pitches.

Stairs spilt for turning
Stairs and handrail split through turn.

Pitch to pitch handrail through 180º turn

Here we can see the handrail keeping a continuous flow from one flight into the next with the handrail coming to level through the turn. this is when you have a stairwell with the flights running parallel to each other and the flights running in opposit directions. The centre line of the drum diameter will be equal to one going.

Handrail at pitch on two adjacent flights.
Handrail at pitch on two adjacent flights.

Flights with parallel landings.

When the hallway is not wide enough or floor plan does not permit parallel flights, the flights will run underneath each other with a landing area parallel to and connecting the flights. When there is a stair well This will require the handrail to return along the landing from the top of one flight to the bottom of the next flight.

Handrail with natural lift across landing.
Handrail with natural lift across landing.

Natural height in turn.

When there is a stairwell equivalent to 1 going, between the spindle centre line on the flights and the spindle centre line on the landing. The handrail will naturally come to level mid turn. The handrail height will also automatically adjust to become equivalent to the handrail height at the centre of a going on the flights.

The mid point handrail height.
The mid point handrail height.

Split, revolve and stack flight.

The above being said, should you need a landing and the flights set over each other, this would be the same as spitting the two flights mid turn, revolving one flight by 180º and stacking it under or over the other flight, then adding a hallway or landing area parallel too and connecting the top and bottom of the repositioned flights.

Stairs split with landing added.
Stairs split with landing added.

Handrail naturally lifting over landing.

Due to the splitting of the handrail mid turn; at which point it is half a rise above the pitch height over the riser/going point. The height of the handrail over the landings will also be 1/2 a rise above the handrail pitch height as set over the riser/going intersection points on the flights.

In this image we have left the spindles out and set a second handrail on the nosings; to show how the handrail lifts over the landing area.

Stairs split with landing, handrail lowered to nosing height.
Stairs split with landing, handrail lowered to nosing height.

The corner close up.

Here we have a close up image of the flight and landing intersection,  showing the spacings used and the natural lift of the handrail.

The rise and going are used to give a smooth flow through the corners and to maintain comfortable heights throughout the handrail run.

Handrail lift in turns over landing.